Employment for returned World War One soldiers

GRS1023 0001 no 1F returned soldiers work (3)fb 1918 10 25

1918 10 25 Letter from Minister of Repatriation

During my years of research, I had found evidence of many ex-servicemen employed on lock construction. With the centenary of the completion of hostilities on the Western Front in WW1 upon us, it was timely then yesterday, when I came across official documents at State Records of SA ascertaining how returned men may be employed on the works. This letter to Mr Eaton, South Australian representative on Murray River Commission, states the need to provide employment for the returned soldiers.

GRS1023 0001 no 1F returned soldiers work fb

Letter to J H O Eaton, SA rep on RMC

GRS1023 0001 no 1F returned soldiers work (2)fb 1918 10 31

Letter from President of Dept of Works and railways

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103 years! A fine day to remember…

Today marks 103 years since the foundation stone was laid at Blanchetown, South Australia, marking the official beginning of the Locking system on the Murray River. Marking the centenary, the book encapsulating the stories of the ‘unknown’ men and women involved over two decades in SA’s share of construction of the locks and weirs, was also launched, Harnessing the River Murray: stories of the people who built Locks 1 to 9, 1915-1935. You can contact me via this page to order your copy. You can watch the short speech made at the centenary and book launch by the author Helen Stagg on this link. Click here.

On June 5 1915 at the historic stone-laying ceremony, the Commissioner of Public Works, Harry Jackson, said: ‘the occasion is the most memorable in the history of SA.’

Premier Crawford Vaughan said: ‘The Murray is SA’s greatest asset and we now rejoice in the hope it is to be fully developed… to usher in a new era of activity and enterprise.’

Attorney Genfoundation stoneeral Billy Hughes said on seeing the river for the first time that day, they were  ‘at the beginning of a new chapter of Australian History, a chapter that was to introduce quite a new era.’

 

Russell John Dumas: South Australian Engineering Heritage

I am excited to be presenting a paper at the upcoming half day Engineering Heritage Conference on May 25 in Adelaide. Hosted by the South Australian Chapter of Engineering Heritage Australia, expert speakers will present papers and reports covering a wide range of topics dealing with the history and preservation of the SA’s engineering heritage. A well-established event, it attracts a broad cross-section of the community including architects, consultants, heritage professionals, historians and engineers. Bookings essential. Click here for more information or to register!

You can view the program on the link above.
pic 1 Dumas PSR oct 1914 p 184 5My paper is on Russell John Dumas and his contribution to the Murray River Waters Scheme. Russell John Dumas, 1887 – 1975, was a ‘home-grown’ SA engineer of exceptional talent and promise. In a 1924 presentation on Murray River lock construction, he claimed that Lock 3 near Overland Corner in South Australia, where he was Resident Engineer, was the first of the larger locks, (with lock chamber, navigable pass-way and sluiceway), to be constructed by an Australian engineer. American engineer, Robert Cutting had been Constructing Engineer at Blanchetown’s Lock 1 at the start of the ambitious River Murray Waters Scheme.
This paper gives archival insight into Dumas’ work on the scheme and shares his personal account of lock-construction. As Resident Engineer at Lock 3, Dumas managed not only the lock and weir construction, but the needs of the small temporary township including provision of amenities such as a school and other facilities.
This paper also touches on accidents and aspects of the life and work of the men and their families, the people involved in the construction of these National Engineering Landmarks, the engineering works on the River Murray.

International Women’s Day: remembering the lock women!

During the research for the book Harnessing the River Murray: stories of the people who built Locks 1 to 9, 1915-1935, I interviewed people who spent their childhood in the lock camps. Today on International Women’s Day, I would like to pay tribute to these strong, hard-working and determined women who raised their families and supported their husbands under very difficult circumstances.

Max Pearson ‘painted’ this particularity apt word-picture of his mother’s domestic work and I believe it represents the other women at the camps:

Ida Pearson

“The houses only had open fires and Mum was an excellent cook for bread and rolls. I am not saying it because she was my mum, but I used to hear people saying behind her back, that they didn’t know how she does it. She’d probably make bread three days a week. At Lock 7, my mother used to sell bread for sixpence a loaf, beautiful bread. The day she was going to make bread, she’d also make rolls, and she’d make buns, and she’d have to get all the dough ready the night before. She’d put us to bed and she’d get this dish, put the dough into it and she would put the dish between her legs and she would punch the dough. For sweets, she’d lay pastry out and put raisins on it and put another sheet of pastry over that and before it was cooked she’d cut it into squares, and we’d have that for sweets. If the cow was in milk, we’d have cow’s milk on it. If the cows were dry and the goats were milking we’d have the cream on it … it was beautiful. Sometimes we had a cow and sometimes we had a couple of goats. We helped milk the cow and goat during the week. My mother would scald the milk and get the cream off it and keep it in the cool-safe for a day or two.”

Thelma McGair, nee Eddy described her mother’s work similarly:

Eva Eddy

“My mother was busy in the house and always looked after Dad because he worked hard. She would get up and get Dad’s breakfast. She had to feed the hot stove all day and she made her own bread, hot cross buns, etc. Life was tough for the women with their wood stoves. The evening meal was a hot meal and we always had sweets such as rice pudding and boiled puddings with jams. It would have taken all day though to prepare meals like that. We were never hungry as Mum could make something out of anything. If someone killed a goat they shared it, and if anybody caught a lot of fish, they shared them too. We ate rabbits all the time.”

Florence Rains

But more severe hardships were endured especially during the great Depression as Evelyn Smith recalled: “It was during the Great Depression: work was scarce and my father was on rationed hours of work with a wife and six children to clothe and feed. Things were so bad at Lock 7 that Mum decided to raffle her sewing machine for threepence a ticket. I of course had to go around selling tickets. How I hated that. I felt it was degrading to have to ask people for money.”

Soldier Settlement: the Premier takes a river trip

In early January 1919, the SA Premier undertook an 8 day trip along the Murray to inspect the state’s capacity for “soldier settlement.” Accompanied by the Commissioner of Public Works and Irrigation, he travelled on the PS Industry, then working on lock- building largely to do with snagging etc. Read full article at the following link:

The Value of Murray Lands: the Premier’s Opinion

The article gives a great first-hand mention of the first lock then underway at Blanchetown and the problems of acquiring suitable stone from nearby locations.

1919 01 18 Randell Lock

Christmas Greetings: a glance back to Lock 5 1926

Happy Christmas!

Social happenings at Lock 5: Mr M S Ward (teacher) went to Adelaide on Friday.

Mr and Mrs Angus McKinnon and two children went to Semaphore for the Christmas holidays.

Mr Mrs G W Martin and children drove to Victor Harbour for Christmas and New Year holidays

Mrs H Cruttenden and infant are staying at Norwood with her mother

 

Mr & Mrs Richards and daughter are going to Melbourne for Christmas

Ms Gilbert is returning to her home in Melbourne

Mr Vincent and his son are going to Melbourne for the Christmas holidays

Mr H T M Angwin and his mother have gone to Sydney for Christmas

(Taken from The Advertiser 21 Dec 1926)

Your Christmas shopping solution: Social history of Murray lock work-camps

IMG_0030The ideal Christmas gift: Harnessing the River Murray: stories of the people who built Locks 1 to 9, 1915-1935’ by Helen Stagg. This book provides a rare insight into life at these remote temporary river towns up to 100 years ago.

Books are $44.95. Postage is in flat-rate sturdy postpak satchel, which means you can order up to three books for the same flat postage rate of $13.80 within Australia. For signature on delivery: add $2.95. With only 7 working days until Christmas, you’d have to act quickly as mail deliveries can be tardy. Books are securely supported in cardboard and bubble wrapped. If you live in Adelaide, we can arrange for you to pick up your copy, Western suburbs.

Message me with your order, and mail address and I will supply bank details.

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