Dr George David Harris, grandfather of Dr Richard Harris: both highly esteemed men!

Dr G D Harris, courtesy Renmark Branch National Trust res

Dr G D Harris. (Pic. courtesy H Everingham)

Dr Richard Harris, the Adelaide anaesthetist who played such a prominent role in the Thai cave rescue, is the grandson of the esteemed Renmark doctor who ministered to several lock communities during construction, Dr George David Harris who died at a very young age in 1945.  It seems many of their qualities of character overlap!

The following extracts from the Renmark newspaper describe the outstanding contribution Dr George David Harris made to the Renmark community.

Dr. G. D. Harris was the Renmark doctor who had the contract to care for the residents at Lock 5 and 6 during the construction. He also initially provided a visiting service at Lock 7 until his brother, Dr John Harris was appointed there in 1931 after the diphtheria epidemic which claimed several children’s lives. However Renmark was greatly shocked when it learnt that Dr. George David Harris had died suddenly on Sunday, October 28. He had been playing tennis at Dr. C A Burns’ court, and was sitting chatting with other players while sheltering from a shower of rain at about 5 o’clock when he had a fatal heart attack.

“Dr. Harris, who was 47 years of age, was the town’s only medical practitioner, having shouldered a real war-time job to which his untimely death could be largely attributed in conscientiously caring for the health of a community of 5,000 people while his partner, Dr. R K Wilson was in the Services. He had been in practice here for the past 20 years, and Renmark was fortunate to have had a doctor of such high professional attainments for so long. The exceptionally fine service which he had rendered to residents during the years and the capable manner in which he had for considerable periods, and more especially in the war years, borne two men’s responsibilities, found a ready response in the hearts of the people, and the high esteem in which he was held was apparent from the widespread expressions of regret at his passing and the striking tributes paid to him.

A Tribute from DR. C. A. BURNS: “It is an honour to pay a tribute, to express a few words of appreciation of well-deserved praise, inadequate as they must be, to such an outstanding doctor and man as Dr. Harris. He was the happy possessor of many rich qualities; his professional attainments, his unselfish devotion to duty, together with his almost unlimited vitality, were a source of inspiration to all who were privileged to know him. His sympathetic nature, kindness of heart and easy manner gained the admiration and respect, the gratitude and love of the whole community. His unselfish and untiring efforts for the general health and wellbeing of the community will long be remembered, for he devoted his unbounded enthusiasm and his wide knowledge constantly to this end. In what nobler way can a man spend his life than by serving and carrying the burdens of his fellows.” Murray Pioneer (Renmark, SA : 1942 – 1950), Thursday 8 November 1945, page 7

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Come to the Fair: Lock 6 School, 1929

On September 6, 1929 1100 children from many regional schools converged in Renmark for River Region Education Week. Each school was allocated colours and Lock 6 children looked resplendent in their pink and silver grey as they participated in a day of sporting activity followed by an evening concert. Some of the scholars who acquitted themselves very well from Lock 6 included Gladys Fitzpatrick, Dorothy McKinnon, Stan Underwood, Gwen Westley and Roy McCully,
At the Renmark area concert that evening the children of the Lock Six School sang ‘Come to the Fair’ which was reportedly the most outstanding item of the evening with their preparation noted as exemplary. They received vigorous applause and shouts of “encore, encore!” filled the hall.

This is the marvellous song they sang, rendered here by the The National Children’s Choir Ireland in a 2003 Concert.

Teacher T A Joraslafsky

Teacher T A Joraslafsky